Stats/Facts

Southern Nevada Child Drowning Statistics
(Source: Southern Nevada Health District)

  • 609 = the number of non-fatal drowning incidents in Southern Nevada from January 2001 through December 2015.  (A non-fatal drowning is defined as resulting in no impairment, some impairment, or significant impairment. It is estimated 20 percent of hospitalized nonfatal drowning victims suffer severe, permanent neurologic disability.)
  • 112 = the number of fatal drownings in Southern Nevada between 2000 & 2015.  That’s an average of 7 child drownings each year.
  • 92 = the number of fatal drownings in Southern Nevada between 2000 & 2015 involving children 4 years of age and younger. 
  • 61% = the percent of submersions (both fatal and non-fatal) that took place in residential swimming pools between 2000 & 2015.
  • Hispanic and minority children are disproportionately affected by drowning deaths.

Visit http://www.southernnevadahealthdistrict.org/stats-reports/drowning-statistics.php or http://www.gethealthyclarkcounty.org/be-safe/drowning-prevention-statistics.php to view the Southern Nevada Health District’s complete Drowning Registry dating back to 1994.


County Child Death Review Reports
(Source: Nevada Institute for Children’s Research & Policy)

  • Drowning was the 4th leading cause of accidental death for children in Clark County in 2011.
  • Drowning was the 2nd leading cause of accidental death for children in Clark County in 2010.
  • Drowning was the 3rd leading cause of accidental death for children in Clark County in 2009, 2008 and 2007.

Click here to view the 2007 – 2011 reports.


The Case for Pool Barriers

According to the annual reports of child deaths in Clark County, the map below illustrates that most drowning incidents occurred in the north central zip codes in Clark County (shown in blue on the map).  Most child drowning cases occurred in older areas of the Las Vegas Valley, showing support for the movement to improve safety barriers for existing pools that were not required to install fences, alarms, or other safety barriers at the time they were built.

(Click on the map to view a larger image.)


Click here for tips to prevent drownings.